Wednesday, June 13, 2007

Truth Will Out!

If one examines Holy Scriptures, one is faced with a choice: either accept textual verisimilitude or conclude that truth is intrinsically unattainable by studying them. Thus Derrida promotes the analysis of Holy Scriptures to deconstruct elitist perceptions of consciousness, since consciousness is defined as a ‘predialectic paradigm of context’.

Lacan concurs in epigamic style: “Religion is part of the neodeconstructivist paradigm of culture.” However, in La Voix et le phénomène , Derrida argues that it is not so much religion that is part of the neodeconstructivist paradigm of culture, but rather that it is contextualised into a socialism that includes narrativity as a reality and which contributes to the meaninglessness, of religion per se.

Foucault rises to this challenge with this towering defence in L’Archéologie du savoir : “But the main theme of Holy Scriptures is a mythopoetical whole. The subject is interpolated into a neocultural Marxism that includes reality as a totality and includes truth as a paradox.” Nevertheless, in La Condition postmoderne Lyotard rejects that we have to choose between textual hermeneutics and postpatriarchial desublimation, which he likens to the defusing of Marxist and Freudian impulses attempted by Deleuze and Guattari, thus encapsulating what was to become the central theme of his seminal Le Differend and delimiting his earlier dogmatic adherence to the theories of Lacan.

This rejection marked Lyotard's disagreement with Husserl's view that hermeneutic and Cartesian circles were congruent, and put him directly at odds with Derrida who had previously supported Husserl's work, Logische Untersuchungen, in his own essay, La Voix et le phénomène.

Notwithstanding Lyotard’s coup de foudre , if the textual paradigm of context holds, and Foucault maintains that it does, one has to choose between subdialectic deconstructive theory and Bataille’s ‘powerful communication’ theory of religion, expounded in his Oeuvres complètes . Or, as Derrida clearly and succinctly states in De la Grammatologie: “One either accepts the textual verisimilitude of Holy Scriptures or one is forced to conclude that truth is intrinsically unattainable from reading and analysing them.”

Quite so, but why did these guys need 7,862 pages and the destruction of several hundred hectares of trees to state the obvious?

4 comments:

Alan Mackenzie said...

I don't wish to sound rude, but has this got anything to do with the Post-modern generator?

The Merchant of Menace said...

Absolutely nothing; simply refer to the works and authors indicated and verify the truth for yourself.

Papalazarou said...

Textual analysis is a very tricky discipline I'm afraid and one of the consequences is that it generates lots of text of its own

However, that doesn't detract from its mission or its discoveries/hypotheses

The Merchant of Menace said...

Textual analysis is a very tricky discipline I'm afraid and one of the consequences is that it generates lots of text of its own

However, that doesn't detract from its mission or its discoveries/hypotheses


Which are?